Spontaneity

Spelunking I have a phone in my pocket, and like many others it has replaced a jumble of items I use on a daily basis: the GPS, Web browser, sketchbook, recorder, guitar amp, language books and even my flashlight. But with all it does, I still have hangups (pardon the pun) about using my phone as a camera. I’ve listened dumbfounded while friends rave about their camera phones and the photos they’ve taken when I know that their best phone camera is not even close to the quality I get with my worst point-and-shoot.

But, alas, when I climb down off my high horse, it is easier to see what everyone is really so happy about. It’s the spontaneity, the accessibility of having a camera, any camera right there to help capture life as you see it, when you see it. As a member of the photo-obsessed who has been carrying camera equipment as a body part over the vast majority of my existence, I sometimes forget how lucky I am to always have had artistic freedom of expression right at hand.

There are times when real life trumps photo life, and I was recently forced to leave my cameras behind while joining a friend to see SPELUNK II, an art and dance exhibit featuring local artists Carl Dimitri, Christine Kim, Mike Yefko and Carl Hirsh at Aurora, in Providence. With live music and a visual presentation in the background, patrons donned headlamps to explore the artworks in a darkened room. I was fascinated by how it all visually came together and how some visitors, like this young silhouetted couple, were enveloped in the kaleidoscopic scene. Caught without my camera, I did what many others now do every day, I called on my phone to satisfy my photo needs.

copyright 2015  Kris Craig / The Providence Journal / 2 Much Time design